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Nomads


Franco Zecchin

Since 1991, Franco Zecchin has spent a long time working on the nomads. These Indians are the eighth population he's visited. He explains to me that these natives continue to keep a spirit that identifies them with their roots, and with regard to the authorities and the government they have fighting attitude. They are not a all resigned. Seeing him so relaxed worries me. Does he stay in contact with Paris, with his family, with his friends when he travels afar? "I always have a little radio with me in order to listen the international news... And then, in the capitals now it's easy to phone or e-mail. Of course, the nomads are not close to the capitals or the great buildings of the cities. But I follow the nomads in their activities. I move with them. What I like of them, the nomads, is the authentic and simple relationship that they develop. And then I love to come face to face with other cultures, other descriptions of the world, other ways of perceiving things. It gives a relativity to my personal vision of the world." It is a question of balance? "No, it's not a question of balance, rather the opposite. I'm looking to unbalance myself, I put myself in critical situations. I throw open the debate on this system of values that is linked to departure, to all that is making-believe in travelling. I close a door behind me and I don't know what is going to happen. I seek as if it were the last journey". When Franco travels, he takes a few books with him. And he write a notebook. Technical notes. Addresses. Timetables. For him, travelling precede photography, but that doesn't mean that he want to go everywhere. That doesn't interest him, he adds, you only live once and you have to be selective. I think that it's safe to say that Franco Zecchin is a very determined man. What's more powerful Franco, the journey itself or the idea of travelling? "I search out of this disruption because I consider it to be vital, this upheaval that forces me to keep moving mentally. It's not necessarily the journey that attracts me, but the idea of re-inventing yourself day by day or living with an awareness of existing. For me, it's also related to photography. To be ready to react to outside visual stimuli. But it's possible to travel in your own neighbourhood... I started travelling before becoming a photographer. Photography is a very good pretext and also in a certain sense something which gives a result". Does he feel alone in his work? "People, in general, like what I do and encourage me to continue. What you have to know is what your aim, your ideal in life is. For example, for me, worldly success is not important, but you can loose yourself as well in your day to day needs. My ambition is to have, in the end, results that will remain with time and that are not related to the moment's fashion. Photography should speak for itself. I have no ideas, I tunes myself in to the immanence in order to be both the exterior and the interior of myself". Facing Franco Zecchin is not a demanding task. And it's just this that is rather rare, this feeling of being an equal, knowing that there is nothing at stake, and above all no wheeling and dealing. Emotionally or ... socially or ... romantically. It's matter of sharing a little time in the present moment, absolutely nothing in the scale of interplanetary relations, and all as we were naturally drawn together, as if we had always known each other. When "Chroniques Siciliennes" (Sicilian Chronicles, with Letizia Battaglia, 1989 Paris, Centre National de la Photo) was published, the photographs gave out such violence and a violence of such purity that I was taken aback. And from that moment I felt an intense admiration for these two reporters who had had, I don't know if the word seems shocking, the guts, or sufficient determination to follow their suject to the very end, without weakening (and despite the threats).
The Man of Great Determination by Brigitte Ollier.
To Aborigines
To Baidans
To Baka Pygmies
To Barabaig
To Bedouin
To Eveny
To Innu
To Mokens
To Mongols
To Touaregs
To Vezo
To Franco Zecchin Book


 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253483

Tamanrasset, Algeria, 1991. Touaregs refugees from Azawad (Mali) living in Soro district.

Tamanrasset, Algeria - 11/11/1991

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253498

Tin Zawatine refugee camp, Algeria, 1991. From the beginning of 1990, more than 130.000 touaregs had escaped from Mali to Algeria, distributed into ten refugee camps; 40.000 people in Burkina Faso and 60.000 in Mauritania.

Tin Zawatine, Algeria - 11/11/1991

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253501

Azawad, Mali, 1991. Base of Taikare. F.P.L.A. touareg fighter sleeps.

Azawad, Mali - 11/11/1991

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029887

Tin Zawatine refugee camp, Algeria, 1991. Touareg woman in childbirth.

Tin Zawatine, Algeria - 11/11/1991

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033516

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. Grandfather and grandchild.

Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033502

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. Into the river Tuul.

Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033507

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. A family into the ger. The Mongols herd five different animals: horses, cattle (which includes yak), camel, sheep and goats.

Aimak Central, Mongolia, Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033509

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. The uurga is a long, flexible pole with a rope loop on one end. The loop is dropped over the head of the horse that the herdsman wants to separate from the rest of the herd - a technique requiring great dexterity and horsemanship.

Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033515

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. The flimsy-looking skeleton of the ger belies its strength. The ger is able to stand against the ferocious storms and winds of the steppes and is remarkably snug and dry even in the wettest of weather. It takes about twenty minutes to assemble a ger and about twice that to take down and pack it.

Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033522

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. Women are responsible for all domestic activities - for cooking, milking and making milk products. In addition, women husk millet, make domestic objects (such as cushions, rugs and drapes), collected dung and fashion it into fuelkakes, herd sheep and goat

Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0033525

Mongolia, Aïmak Central, 1994. Children's chores begin at an early age. They learn to ride almost as soon as they can walk and, while still young, assume responsibility for the herding of the sheep and goats. They also help in collection of animal dung that will be dried for use as fuel to cook their food and warm their ger. Traditionally children lived with their parents until they where adults.

Aimak Central, Mongolia, Aïmak Central, Mongolia - 01/08/1994

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029909

Gehandu, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. Boy with a cock. In socio-economic terms, the Barabaig can show that the reduction in the resource base by the land alienation is being reflected in a decline in cattle numbers and a worsening in the quality of their lives.

Gehandu, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 06/07/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029908

Barabaig of Tanzania. Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. Girls during a Lochmadjega ceremony. Mureru is the center of the Barabaig life and culture.

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 06/07/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251851

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. Men drinking the traditional alcohol Gesuda. Nomadism is regarded by administrators as evidence of disorganization and an obstruction to development. Settlement of pastoralists is therefore regarded as a prerequisite to efficient production and the integration of pastoral populations into mainstream society.

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251252

Katesh, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. Cattle market. Consistent with the pastoral ideal, the Barabaig make every effort to serve the needs of their livestock. Location of habitation and movement of Barabaig households, therefore, is primarily determined by considerations of animal husbandry.

Katesh, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 00/00/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251850

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. Men dancing to celebrate a Lochmadjega, a ceremony in honour of an ancestor.

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251266

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. A woman is milking a cow. Cows, goats, sheep and donkeys have got names and also specific symbols which everyone is supposed to know and identify from the other. This make easy to recognise whose livestocks get lost and to return it to the respective family house..

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 00/00/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029907

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, 1996. The village assembly. The Barabaig have existed on the same pasture resources held in common for hundred of years without destroying them. One of the reasons for their success arises from the way they regard the land. They accept that they are an integral part of a wider whole that includes soils, water, vegetation and animals. Being members of a larger entity, they treat land with the utmost respect. They are able to enjoy its bounty, but not regard it as a commodity and exploit it without considering its future preservation.

Mureru, Hanang district, Tanzania, united republic of - 06/07/1996

autorisation orale

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253799

Andravony, Madagascar, 1993. Preparing the evening meal. Vezos live in the semi-dry zone of south-west Madagascar; they are members of a sea nomadic community and they live of gathering, hunting and fishing on the coralline platforms, littoral dune, mangroves and xerophilous forest near a sandy open coast.

Andravony, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029890

Antsepoka, Madagascar, 1993. The agility of nomad society, hits ability to integrate different cultures without losing their own, is a cultural strength.

Antsepoka, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029888

Tsifota, Madagascar, 1993. The capture of a turtle is a solemn moment of the village life. Children are draggin the 200 kg turtle just caught on open sea.

Tsifota, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253800

Manombo, Madagascar, 1993. Fish and goods are carried from the pirogues landing-place to the village market. From April to June is a transition period for Vezos: between the end of rains and the cool season. From the villages they are gradually preparing and moving to the offing islands, for the big annual migration.

Manombo, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253802

Salary, Madagascar, 1993. Vezos learn from the childhood how to manage with pirogues. They have always fascinated people that have been approaching them; the beauty of their thin well-balanced pirogues, pushed by quadrangular sails, strengthens the poetical breeze that surrounds the sea nomadism.

Salary, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029889

Tsifota, Madagascar, 1993. Fishing with the narrow-meshed net. A pure nomad is a poor nomad. Poverty is accepted, even claimed. Their way of environmental exploitation refuses fishing techniques that can put in danger their ideology, their symbolic naval technology, the ecological balance of their environment.

Tsifota, Madagascar - 05/05/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029897

North of Safawi, Jordan, 1994. The Bedouin hospitality rule: to offer the coffee to any new visitors. To adapt to their harsh environment they followed a fairly consistent pattern of migration reinforced by tribal custom and desert economy.

North of Safawi, Jordan - 13/12/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029891

North of Oualata, Mauritania, 1993. Moving to another camp.

North of Oualata, Mauritania - 03/11/1993

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251900

Wadi Rum, Jordan, 1994. Al Zalaibe tent. Basically herdsmen whose occupation is animal husbandry, the Bedouin in a effort to adapt to the environment, adopted a life-style best characterized as mobile or nomadic.

Wadi Rum, Jordan - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0412293

The Bedouin of Jordan, Wadi Rum, 1994. Sa'idiyine women into the tent. The most prosperous families usually have not only the biggest flocks but also the most extensive resources outside the Badia.

Wadi Rum, Jordan - 17/05/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251217

North of Oualata, Mauritania, 1993. Family on the move. The woman and young child ride on camel while man and children walk alongside.

North of Oualata, Mauritania - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251212

North of Oualata, Mauritania, 1993. Hammunat women wearing a long piece of cloth known as a melhafa.

North of Oualata, Mauritania - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251205

North of Oualata, Mauritania, 1993. Nemadi children drinking camel's fresh milk early morning.

North of Oualata, Mauritania - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251221

North of Oualata, Mauritania, 1993. Girls and boys in public school.

North of Oualata, Mauritania - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029900

Salapoumbe, Cameroon, 1995. Children playing Mokinda drums. In addition to its function in very precise social activities, music also gives daily expression to the mood of the moment. Thus, some of the chants which one might suppose to be the most restrained in their use, may spontaneously accompany children's games or activities as commonplace as swimming.

Salapoumbe, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252740

Ngola, Cameroon, 1995. Circumcision feast. The Pygmies have the custom of poking fun at someone in order to reduce the tension and difference which hinder human relations (either by restoring normality or by coping with the difference). Physical violence is rare; social pressure is generally exerted verbally in the form of irony, supported by pantomime.

Ngola, Salapoumbe district, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252698

Salapoumbe, Cameroon, 1995. A man setting a trap in the forest. The Baka ability to exploit natural resources depends on remarkable skill in observing and analysing their environment. The proper use of hunting weapons is dependent on techniques involving a refined acquaintance with the animals' runs, feeding habits and life cycles.

Salapoumbe, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252645

Tembe, Cameroon, 1995. Play of children.

Tembe, Salapoumbe district, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252737

Ngatto, Cameroon, 1995. A dead monkey for sale along the pathway. The Baka are one of the rare groups in the world to have retained until recently a type of relationship with their natural surroundings and a type of social organisation which have hardly changed since ancient times.

Ngatto, Salapoumbe district, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252746

Ngatto, Cameroon, 1995. A woman building the mongulu , a kind of egg-shaped dwelling made of a framework of branches covered with large overlapping leaves.

Ngatto, Salapoumbe district, Cameroon - 05/05/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029905

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, 1996. Spring Festival. Lassos are made of reindeer hide.

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, Russian federation - 03/03/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252088

Camp n° 6, Sakkyryr, Yakutia, 1996. Normally herders use the narta, the wooden sledge, for transport; sometimes they organize sudden races. They test their performances for the spring festival.

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, Russian federation - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252176

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, 1996. The Eveny's outer clothing is made mostly of reindeer fur, which is extremely heat-retentive because each individual hair is hollow.

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, Russian federation - 00/00/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252110

Camp n° 5, Sakkyryr, Yakutia, 1996. Pavel (12) is making little puppet representing herders and deer.

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, Russian federation - 00/00/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029904

Camp N° 5, Sakkyryr, Yakutia, 1996. A killed deer. The reindeer are constantly on the move in search of food. The snow protects the fragile moss from destruction by hooves and feet, but leave it accessible to a deer's foraging snout.

Sakkyryr, Yakutia, Russian federation - 03/03/1996

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029892

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. A woman walking in the village.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 03/03/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253816

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. Man fishing.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253817

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. Mokens are sea nomads. They travel in little convoy from one island to another. The Moken are living quite permanently on theirs boats endowed of mobile roof; they have a strong resistance to sedentariness.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 03/03/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029893

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. Child playing with a bird.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 03/03/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253807

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. Children with a play gun.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 03/03/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253812

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. Every day, during the low tide, people go to gather food on the beaches.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 00/00/0000

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0253810

Ko Surin, Thailand, 1994. A child carrying a boat miniature. Moken boats, the traditional dwellings of these nomadic fishing peoples, are well-equipped to ensure the autonomy of domestic groups during long sailing voyages in the dry season.

Ko Surin, Thailand - 03/03/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029899

Wadi Araba, Jordan, 1994 A child playing with boots. Rain, more often than not, is in the form of cloudbursts falling in limited areas, causing flash floods in some of the wadis. Basically the Badia is devoid of any perennial water. It is, however, dotted with shallow wells supplying the Bedouin with water for part of the year.

Wadi Araba, Jordan - 13/11/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029898

South of Safawi, Jordan, 1994. A girl with sheep. For the pragmatic Bedouin, sheep and goats have become a preferred form of wealth through which he somewhat maintains his traditional way of life hence achieving much needed psychological and social satisfaction.

South of Safawi, Jordan - 13/11/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251910

Wadi Rum, Jordan, 1994. An Al Zalaibe woman milking a goat. The flocks are cared for by shepherd families and small groups of workers, relying on their vehicles for water and other supplies.

Wadi Rum, Jordan - 00/00/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0251890

Safawi, Jordan, 1994. A young mother with her children. Nearly all of the Bedoiun regard their flocks as their basic asset, to be nurtured and increased. For the poorer ones amongst them, the family flocks are insurance policies against loss of jobs or other troubles.

Safawi, Jordan - 00/00/1994

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252243

Mingan, Quebec, 1995. The waiting. Idleness among adults is essentially caused by lack of work, giving rise to feelings of uselessness, loss of self-confidence, and jealousy toward those who work, and it is often an inducement to alcohol and drug abuse and addiction.

Mingan, Quebec, Canada - 00/00/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252203

Mingan, Quebec, 1995. The traditional roles that aboriginals once fulfilled to ensure their individual and community economic, cultural, and spiritual survival were discarded with imposed sedentarisation within territorial enclaves, the administration and organisation of which were long alien to them and governed from outside; these enclaves, in many cases, are too small to serve today as bases for economic development.

Mingan, Quebec, Canada - 00/00/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0029902

Schefferville reserve, Quebec, 1995. The hunt pause. If anciently the bow and the arrows, the lance, the corral and the noose were currently used to kill the caribou, today it is essentially utilized the gun.

Schefferville, Quebec, Canada - 10/10/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252322

Mingan, Quebec, 1995. A party at the community centre. The colonisation process imposed 125 years ago on Amerindians in Quebec, as well as on those in the rest of Canada, was deliberately aimed at convincing them to give up their spiritual and educative values and their social, cultural, economic, and administrative norms, all based on community life and harmony, and adopt the values of the surrounding global society, based on confrontation and individual ambitions.

Mingan, Quebec, Canada - 00/00/1995

 

Franco Zecchin / Picturetank ZEF0252323

Schefferville reserve, Quebec, 1995. Improvised dance to the fire. The Innu venerate the forest generator of all life sources. They believe in the presence of spiritual forces everywhere, in the soul of everything and every species, and in the essential place of everyone into the cosmic circle, humans included. All these beliefs encourage the respect for each element, and for the environment balance, as well as they favour the prayer and the perfect communion with the universe.

Schefferville, Quebec, Canada - 00/00/0000



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